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Animals in the Palæoboreanic Diet

Copyright © 1999-2020 C.E. by D. Jon Scott

Introduction

Note that a lot of these images are not my artwork; they are public domain illustrations that I tracked down to save myself the time of having to draw a ton of animals. I will replace these with original artwork at a later time.




Meats

Partial fossil skeletons of butchered animals have been discovered in association with Pal├Žoboreanic settlements, including aurochsen, buffalo, wisents, muskoxen, mouflon/musmon, argali, antelope, goats, ibexes, aoudads, Pyrenean chamois, gazelles, Cretan deer, red deer (“elk” in North America), elk (“moose” in North America), giant deer (“Irish elk”), reindeer (“caribou”), okapis, wild boar, mammoths, dwarf elephants, narrow-nosed rhinoceroses, giant unicorns, tarpans, hippopotamuses, dwarf hippopotamuses, European hippopotamuses, macaques, sea cows, walruses, European giant beavers, crocodiles, giant swans, beluga sturgeon, grey mullets, surmullets, codfish, European congers, Mediterranean morays, halibuts, anchovies, mackerels, sardines, herring, carp, wels catfish, and Deninger’s cave bear (Hardy & Fischer 2003), some of which so foreign in nativity as to be thought by their very presence indicative of extensive trade networks (Tiller & Wright 2003).

For more information, see meat in the Palæoboreanic diet.

Red Meats — Red meats were mostly consumed by countryfolk in sparsely-populated venues. Larger, urbanized settlements got most of their red meat imported in preserved form from the country. This is because the raising of animals to be used as food was an uncommon practice.

White Meats




Eggs

.

Amniotic Eggs — bird eggs and other reptile eggs.

Fish & Amphibian Eggs — roe, caviar, and the like.




Dairy

Most Boreans retained lactose tolerance into adulthood, however a significant minority would begin to lose lactose tolerance sometime after the onset of adolescence, while others would lose the trait far later, nearing old age. Ancient Borean literature observes that men tended to lose lactose tolerance more often than women, and on average at younger ages, while individuals of either sex with larger eyes and foreheads paired with smaller lower-faces tended less often to lose lactose tolerance than others of their sex. It is therefore likely that Borean lactose tolerance was a side-effect of an evolutionary trend toward neotenous traits, rather than a separate trait that was individually selected for as in later H. sapiens.



Animals in the Palæoboreanic Diet
Meat
Eggs
Dairy
Honey

Palæoboreanic Diet
⚑ Animals
Fungi
Plants

Borean Food
Palæoboreanic Diet
Borean Cuisine
Food-getting Strategies

Civilization & Culture
Borean Technology
Languages
⚑ Borean Food

Civilization & Culture
Borean Technology
Languages
Borean Food

Ancient Borea
The Borean World
The Palæoboreanica
Civilization & Culture
People & Races
Monsters
⚑ = You Are Here.

Fiction
Ancient Borea
Red the Blue Devil
The Nocturnals
The Spacebunnies
Metazoids
Solar Civil War
⚑ = You Are Here.

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